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  • Teacher Brett

Creating Phonological Awareness Centers



Phonological awareness is a broad term that refers to an individual's awareness of the sounds in spoken language. It includes phonemic awareness, which is the ability to recognize and manipulate individual phonemes (sounds) in spoken words, as well as other skills such as being able to identify and manipulate syllables, onsets and rimes, and larger units of sound such as words and sentences.


Phonological awareness is a key component of reading and spelling development, as it involves being able to hear and manipulate the sounds in spoken language. Children who have strong phonological awareness skills are better able to learn to read and spell because they are able to break words down into their component sounds and manipulate those sounds to read and spell new words.


Phonological awareness can be developed through a variety of activities and games that focus on rhyming, syllables, and identifying and manipulating sounds in spoken language. These activities are typically introduced in the preschool and early elementary school years and involve activities such as listening for and identifying the sounds at the beginning or end of words, blending and segmenting sounds to make new words, and identifying and manipulating syllables in words. However, older students who have weak decoding skills may still benefit from working on phonemic awareness skills (blending, segmenting, and manipulating the sounds in words).


Here are some ideas for creating phonological awareness centers in the classroom:

  1. Rhyme Time: Set up a center with a variety of books that contain rhyming words. Encourage students to read the books and identify the rhyming words.

  2. Sound Sort: Create a center with a variety of objects (e.g., a toy car, a ball, a stuffed animal) and cards with the initial sounds of the objects written on them. Students can sort the objects into piles based on their initial sounds.

  3. Syllable Station: Set up a center with a variety of objects (e.g., a pencil, a rubber band, a toy car) and cards with the number of syllables in the names of the objects written on them. Students can sort the objects into piles based on the number of syllables in their names.

  4. Word Work: Create a center with a variety of word-building materials such as letter tiles, magnetic letters, or Scrabble tiles. Encourage students to build and manipulate words using the materials.

  5. Word Detective: Set up a center with a variety of puzzles and games that involve identifying and manipulating sounds in words (e.g., Boggle, Ghost).

It's important to provide a variety of materials and activities at each center to keep students engaged and to give them the opportunity to practice different phonological awareness skills. It's also a good idea to rotate the centers periodically to keep things fresh and interesting for students.

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