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IEP Goal: Identifying the Front and Back Cover of a Book

Updated: Dec 27, 2022



Here is a sample IEP (Individualized Education Plan) goal for identifying the various parts of a book:


Goal: Given a (developmentally appropriate/grade level/fiction/non-fiction) book, STUDENT will demonstrate print concepts, by identifying (front cover, back of book, title page, book spine, page of book, author, title, and illustrator), with 80% accuracy, in 4 out of 5 opportunities, by MONTH, YEAR.


Objectives:

  • The student will be able to identify the front cover of a book when it is facing up.

  • The student will be able to identify the back cover of a book when it is facing up.

  • The student will be able to locate and identify the title page of a book.

  • The student will be able to identify the book spine of a book when it is standing upright.

  • The student will be able to identify a page of a book when it is open.

  • The student will be able to locate and identify the author of a book.

  • The student will be able to locate and identify the title of a book.

  • The student will be able to locate and identify the illustrator of a book (if applicable).


Progress Monitoring:

  • The teacher will regularly observe and document the student's progress in identifying the various parts of a book.

  • The student will participate in ongoing assessments, such as book scavenger hunts or labeling tasks, to measure their progress in identifying the various parts of a book.

  • The student's progress will be shared with the student, the student's family, and other members of the IEP team on a regular basis.

Adjustments and Accommodations:

  • As needed, the student may receive additional support and scaffolding from the teacher and instructional staff to help them meet their goal of identifying the various parts of a book.

  • The student may also benefit from the use of visual or multisensory supports, such as labeled diagrams or manipulatives, to help them understand the various parts of a book.

  • The student may need additional time and repetition to practice and master their understanding of the various parts of a book.

Instructional Tips:


Here are some ideas for teaching a student to identify the front and back cover of a book:

  1. Provide explicit instruction and modeling on how to locate and identify the various parts of a book. Have the student participate in teacher-led whole group and small group activities that focus on identifying the various parts of a book.

  2. Use visual supports: Show the student a picture or real-life example of a book with the front cover facing up. Then, turn the book over and show the student the back cover. Repeat this process a few times to help the student understand the difference between the front and back covers.

  3. Use tactile clues: The student can practice identifying the various parts of a book through a variety of interactive, multisensory activities, including hands-on manipulatives, visual aids, and computer-based games and activities. Have the student feel the front and back covers of a book, pointing out any distinguishing features such as the title or author's name on the front cover and the publisher information on the back cover.

  4. Use verbal labels: While showing the student a book with the front cover facing up, say, "This is the front cover." Then, turn the book over and say, "This is the back cover." Repeat this process a few times, using the labels consistently to help the student associate the words with the correct covers.

  5. Practice with a variety of books: Give the student opportunities to handle and examine a variety of texts, including picture books, chapter books, and nonfiction texts. Have the student practice identifying the front and back covers of different types of books, such as picture books, chapter books, and nonfiction texts. This will help the student generalize the skill to different types of texts.

  6. Incorporate book-handling skills: As the student becomes more familiar with the front and back covers, you can teach them other book-handling skills such as opening a book, turning the pages, and closing the book. This will help the student develop a deeper understanding of how to handle and use books effectively.

  7. Provide Immediate Feedback: Give the student ongoing feedback and support from the teacher and other instructional staff to help them develop their understanding of the various parts of a book.


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